FREE IF YOU DARE

All he wanted was a coffee and a cigarette.
She gave him the Universe and a pack of Dunhills.

(Source: blazeberg, via paranoid)

noorannmatties:

Selections from ‘Rituals’, by Noorann Matties

Forced to examine ourselves in ways many normally avoid, Rituals as a project sought to capture the moment in which we our lives become devoid of distraction and we become intimately aware of ourselves. By photographing people’s personal beauty rituals I attempted to capture this awareness, this intimacy that occurs only when one is forced to examine their own body, the most basic thing that is theirs, and build upon it.

view the complete series at http://inconnumag.com/rituals/

(via ffathersjoy)

supermodelshrine:

Naomi by Jean-Marie Périer, 1996

supermodelshrine:

Naomi by Jean-Marie Périer, 1996

(via gogoartqueen)

detailsofpaintings:

François Hubert Drouais and Studio, Portrait of a Lady, said to be Mademoiselle de Forges (details)

c. 1770 

(via mashamorevna)

vanityfair:

V.F. Portrait | Alan Cumming
Photograph by Annie Leibovitz. 

vanityfair:

V.F. Portrait | Alan Cumming

Photograph by Annie Leibovitz. 

(via jeremy-ruiner)

“The truth is, everyone likes to look down on someone. If your favorites are all avant-garde writers who throw in Sanskrit and German, you can look down on everyone. If your favorites are all Oprah Book Club books, you can at least look down on mystery readers. Mystery readers have sci-fi readers. Sci-fi can look down on fantasy. And yes, fantasy readers have their own snobbishness. I’ll bet this, though: in a hundred years, people will be writing a lot more dissertations on Harry Potter than on John Updike. Look, Charles Dickens wrote popular fiction. Shakespeare wrote popular fiction - until he wrote his sonnets, desperate to show the literati of his day that he was real artist. Edgar Allan Poe tied himself in knots because no one realized he was a genius. The core of the problem is how we want to define “literature”. The Latin root simply means “letters”. Those letters are either delivered - they connect with an audience - or they don’t. For some, that audience is a few thousand college professors and some critics. For others, its twenty million women desperate for romance in their lives. Those connections happen because the books successfully communicate something real about the human experience. Sure, there are trashy books that do really well, but that’s because there are trashy facets of humanity. What people value in their books - and thus what they count as literature - really tells you more about them than it does about the book.”

—   

Brent Weeks (via victoriousvocabulary)

BAM

(via yeahwriters)

(via fuck-me-barnes)

nearlyvintage:

 

arvidabystrom:

cross-connect:

Selected works from Natalya Lobanova.

Posted to Cross-Connect by Mike.

classics

(via jemexcusemaman)

junkfoodvideo:

A Streetcar Named Desire, 1951

junkfoodvideo:

A Streetcar Named Desire, 1951

(via caughtinanocean)